A CALL to remember

CAM01897[1]THE security guard gave me a stern look as I walked in the entrance hall. My companion said, “we’re here for check-up, our organization is responsible for her so I need to accompany her…” Then with a slight smile, a more relaxed expression, the man said, “oh, I know her! I can recognize her by her eyes!” (I am probably the only Asian patient so far in that hospital.) In three months I had visited the hospital twice. Once in January and the second time in March.

The first time I was diagnosed with Gastritis. Two months later with Bronchitis. The doctors and the hospital staff at the out-patient-section are already familiar faces. I wasn’t only there for a short time but had to spend an entire day for consultation, medications, and observation, then consultation again. I had never spent that long in a hospital in my life. “There’s always a first time,” the doctor told me on my second visit as I was taking nebulization to improve my breathing caused by bronchitis.

I praise God for the experience. I praise the Creator for choosing me to be in that situation. It was hard especially that I am away from home. There were times I wished that my parents were with me, especially this March when the doctor required me to be on bed rest for three days (to one week). I felt useless, thinking that I am giving much burden to my placement site for not reporting and participating those days.

I praise God that although my parents were not with me, God provided me with friends who took care of me. My supervisors in CEPALC were always checking on me. My workmates were calling and continually encouraging me. And church friends were there to pray with me. During that time I can see God’s warm embrace through the people He used. Continue reading

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f1462912“…He will give a crown of beauty for ashes,
a joyous blessing instead of mourning,
festive praise instead of despair…”

-Isaiah 61:3

Two hours, a thousand steps, catching my breath at an altitude of more than 3,000 meters above sea level, finally I reached the top and learned how to control my breathing.

Going to Monserrate by foot was the craziest thing I ever did here in Bogota (so far). I knew that my body has not adjusted well (yet) with the altitude but I still decided to go up with a bunch of friends from work on a national holiday. Honestly, halfway to Monserrate, I thought of giving up. I mean, I can still go down (which was easier) and take the cable car up. I praise God for having good companions who were very patient with me during my long stops. There are 10 stations (and stops) going up the pilgrimage site. Continue reading